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halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 
The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.
Read more via The New York Times.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

(via 27millionvoicestoday)

http://globalvoices.tumblr.com/post/94441170789/now-that-security-safety-and-public-order-have

globalvoices:

"Now that security, safety and public order have been restored to normalcy, the authorities have decided to open Freedom Park from today."

Police removed the barricades and razor wires surrounding Cambodia’s Freedom Park in the capital city of Phnom Penh after local authorities

Iran’s Banksy: ‘The walls in my city are the canvas for my paintings’
Banksy-inspired Iranian street artist Black Hand utilizes public spaces in Tehran as a way to explore issues and find peace, believing that “our intellectual and artistic society are underestimating and ignoring ordinary people’s power.” While Iran’s history in using street walls for protest predates the 1979 revolution, today authorities only tolerate state-sponsored graffiti and paintings, and views Black Hand’s art as subversive.

Iran’s Banksy: ‘The walls in my city are the canvas for my paintings’

Banksy-inspired Iranian street artist Black Hand utilizes public spaces in Tehran as a way to explore issues and find peace, believing that “our intellectual and artistic society are underestimating and ignoring ordinary people’s power.” While Iran’s history in using street walls for protest predates the 1979 revolution, today authorities only tolerate state-sponsored graffiti and paintings, and views Black Hand’s art as subversive.

How to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Africa

It is African civil society that often acts as the primary guarantor of basic human rights across the continent. It is African civil society that works to maintain social stability and cohesion, helping to create positive investment environments while working to increase transparency and hold leaders accountable.

Ahead of next month’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Jeffrey Smith writes that its impact on human rights can only succeed if it includes African civil society activists, at a time when human rights groups across Africa have come under increasing attack. 
In its report Freedom in the World 2014, Freedom House found that in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole, all seven categories of political rights and civil liberties have declined over the past five years.

How to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Africa

It is African civil society that often acts as the primary guarantor of basic human rights across the continent. It is African civil society that works to maintain social stability and cohesion, helping to create positive investment environments while working to increase transparency and hold leaders accountable.

Ahead of next month’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Jeffrey Smith writes that its impact on human rights can only succeed if it includes African civil society activists, at a time when human rights groups across Africa have come under increasing attack. 

In its report Freedom in the World 2014, Freedom House found that in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole, all seven categories of political rights and civil liberties have declined over the past five years.

uuunoffice:

Our director Bruce Knotts visited the White House to discuss LGBTQ Human Rights! 
'On June 20th, I was the third to the last speaker at the end of a week-long opportunity for civil society to provide input to the United Nations as it formulates its Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide global development efforts from 2015-2030. We were one of 90 groups which support an independent #10 dedicated to human rights. However, we were the only group which called for explicit mention of LGBTQ human rights. Our intervention was the only to receive applause that day. The co-chairs said they supported our initiative, but they doubted it would be accepted by the consensus of the member states of the U.N. We have an uphill fight ahead of us. Our intervention was included in the written outcome document. We will have another opportunity to provide our ideas on implementation later this month.’ Read more here.

uuunoffice:

Our director Bruce Knotts visited the White House to discuss LGBTQ Human Rights! 

'On June 20th, I was the third to the last speaker at the end of a week-long opportunity for civil society to provide input to the United Nations as it formulates its Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide global development efforts from 2015-2030. We were one of 90 groups which support an independent #10 dedicated to human rights. However, we were the only group which called for explicit mention of LGBTQ human rights. Our intervention was the only to receive applause that day. The co-chairs said they supported our initiative, but they doubted it would be accepted by the consensus of the member states of the U.N. We have an uphill fight ahead of us. Our intervention was included in the written outcome document. We will have another opportunity to provide our ideas on implementation later this month.’ Read more here.

BDS Movement: Effective BDS actions more important than ever to support Palestinians in Gaza and hold Israel to account

Nine years on from the historic Palestinian call for boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS), issued by the overwhelming majority of Palestinian society on July 9 2005, the BDS movement has opened the most crucial and empowering space for effective international solidarity with the Palestinian people’s struggle for freedom, justice and equality.

Read about some recent significant BDS-related developments here.

BDS Movement: Effective BDS actions more important than ever to support Palestinians in Gaza and hold Israel to account

Nine years on from the historic Palestinian call for boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS), issued by the overwhelming majority of Palestinian society on July 9 2005, the BDS movement has opened the most crucial and empowering space for effective international solidarity with the Palestinian people’s struggle for freedom, justice and equality.

Read about some recent significant BDS-related developments here.

humanrightswatch:


Syria: War’s Toll on Women
 Women in Syria have been arbitrarily arrested and detained, physically abused, harassed, and tortured during Syria’s conflict by government forces, pro-government militias, and armed groups opposed to the government.
Through written and photographic portraits, the report documents ways in which the conflict impacts women in particular. Women profiled in the report experienced violations by government and pro-government forces as well as by armed groups opposed to the government such as Liwa’al-Islam and extremist groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS). Some female activists and humanitarian aid providers said they had been threatened, arbitrarily arrested and detained, and tortured by government or armed opposition forces. All six former detainees profiled in the report experienced physical abuse or torture in detention; one woman was sexually assaulted multiple times. Other women said they had been victims of discriminatory restrictions on their dress and movement. Several women were injured or lost family members in indiscriminate attacks on civilians by government forces.
Photo: Some of the women profiled in this report, all of whom are now refugees in Turkey due to ongoing conflict and threats to their personal freedom and security in Syria. © 2014 Samer Muscati/ Human Rights Watch

humanrightswatch:

Syria: War’s Toll on Women

 Women in Syria have been arbitrarily arrested and detained, physically abused, harassed, and tortured during Syria’s conflict by government forces, pro-government militias, and armed groups opposed to the government.

Through written and photographic portraits, the report documents ways in which the conflict impacts women in particular. Women profiled in the report experienced violations by government and pro-government forces as well as by armed groups opposed to the government such as Liwa’al-Islam and extremist groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS). Some female activists and humanitarian aid providers said they had been threatened, arbitrarily arrested and detained, and tortured by government or armed opposition forces. All six former detainees profiled in the report experienced physical abuse or torture in detention; one woman was sexually assaulted multiple times. Other women said they had been victims of discriminatory restrictions on their dress and movement. Several women were injured or lost family members in indiscriminate attacks on civilians by government forces.

Photo: Some of the women profiled in this report, all of whom are now refugees in Turkey due to ongoing conflict and threats to their personal freedom and security in Syria. © 2014 Samer Muscati/ Human Rights Watch

(via humanrightsupdates)