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http://globalvoices.tumblr.com/post/94441170789/now-that-security-safety-and-public-order-have

globalvoices:

"Now that security, safety and public order have been restored to normalcy, the authorities have decided to open Freedom Park from today."

Police removed the barricades and razor wires surrounding Cambodia’s Freedom Park in the capital city of Phnom Penh after local authorities

Iran’s Banksy: ‘The walls in my city are the canvas for my paintings’
Banksy-inspired Iranian street artist Black Hand utilizes public spaces in Tehran as a way to explore issues and find peace, believing that “our intellectual and artistic society are underestimating and ignoring ordinary people’s power.” While Iran’s history in using street walls for protest predates the 1979 revolution, today authorities only tolerate state-sponsored graffiti and paintings, and views Black Hand’s art as subversive.

Iran’s Banksy: ‘The walls in my city are the canvas for my paintings’

Banksy-inspired Iranian street artist Black Hand utilizes public spaces in Tehran as a way to explore issues and find peace, believing that “our intellectual and artistic society are underestimating and ignoring ordinary people’s power.” While Iran’s history in using street walls for protest predates the 1979 revolution, today authorities only tolerate state-sponsored graffiti and paintings, and views Black Hand’s art as subversive.

How to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Africa

It is African civil society that often acts as the primary guarantor of basic human rights across the continent. It is African civil society that works to maintain social stability and cohesion, helping to create positive investment environments while working to increase transparency and hold leaders accountable.

Ahead of next month’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Jeffrey Smith writes that its impact on human rights can only succeed if it includes African civil society activists, at a time when human rights groups across Africa have come under increasing attack. 
In its report Freedom in the World 2014, Freedom House found that in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole, all seven categories of political rights and civil liberties have declined over the past five years.

How to Roll Out the Red Carpet for Africa

It is African civil society that often acts as the primary guarantor of basic human rights across the continent. It is African civil society that works to maintain social stability and cohesion, helping to create positive investment environments while working to increase transparency and hold leaders accountable.

Ahead of next month’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Jeffrey Smith writes that its impact on human rights can only succeed if it includes African civil society activists, at a time when human rights groups across Africa have come under increasing attack. 

In its report Freedom in the World 2014, Freedom House found that in sub-Saharan Africa as a whole, all seven categories of political rights and civil liberties have declined over the past five years.

uuunoffice:

Our director Bruce Knotts visited the White House to discuss LGBTQ Human Rights! 
'On June 20th, I was the third to the last speaker at the end of a week-long opportunity for civil society to provide input to the United Nations as it formulates its Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide global development efforts from 2015-2030. We were one of 90 groups which support an independent #10 dedicated to human rights. However, we were the only group which called for explicit mention of LGBTQ human rights. Our intervention was the only to receive applause that day. The co-chairs said they supported our initiative, but they doubted it would be accepted by the consensus of the member states of the U.N. We have an uphill fight ahead of us. Our intervention was included in the written outcome document. We will have another opportunity to provide our ideas on implementation later this month.’ Read more here.

uuunoffice:

Our director Bruce Knotts visited the White House to discuss LGBTQ Human Rights! 

'On June 20th, I was the third to the last speaker at the end of a week-long opportunity for civil society to provide input to the United Nations as it formulates its Sustainable Development Goals, which will guide global development efforts from 2015-2030. We were one of 90 groups which support an independent #10 dedicated to human rights. However, we were the only group which called for explicit mention of LGBTQ human rights. Our intervention was the only to receive applause that day. The co-chairs said they supported our initiative, but they doubted it would be accepted by the consensus of the member states of the U.N. We have an uphill fight ahead of us. Our intervention was included in the written outcome document. We will have another opportunity to provide our ideas on implementation later this month.’ Read more here.

BDS Movement: Effective BDS actions more important than ever to support Palestinians in Gaza and hold Israel to account

Nine years on from the historic Palestinian call for boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS), issued by the overwhelming majority of Palestinian society on July 9 2005, the BDS movement has opened the most crucial and empowering space for effective international solidarity with the Palestinian people’s struggle for freedom, justice and equality.

Read about some recent significant BDS-related developments here.

BDS Movement: Effective BDS actions more important than ever to support Palestinians in Gaza and hold Israel to account

Nine years on from the historic Palestinian call for boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS), issued by the overwhelming majority of Palestinian society on July 9 2005, the BDS movement has opened the most crucial and empowering space for effective international solidarity with the Palestinian people’s struggle for freedom, justice and equality.

Read about some recent significant BDS-related developments here.

humanrightswatch:


Syria: War’s Toll on Women
 Women in Syria have been arbitrarily arrested and detained, physically abused, harassed, and tortured during Syria’s conflict by government forces, pro-government militias, and armed groups opposed to the government.
Through written and photographic portraits, the report documents ways in which the conflict impacts women in particular. Women profiled in the report experienced violations by government and pro-government forces as well as by armed groups opposed to the government such as Liwa’al-Islam and extremist groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS). Some female activists and humanitarian aid providers said they had been threatened, arbitrarily arrested and detained, and tortured by government or armed opposition forces. All six former detainees profiled in the report experienced physical abuse or torture in detention; one woman was sexually assaulted multiple times. Other women said they had been victims of discriminatory restrictions on their dress and movement. Several women were injured or lost family members in indiscriminate attacks on civilians by government forces.
Photo: Some of the women profiled in this report, all of whom are now refugees in Turkey due to ongoing conflict and threats to their personal freedom and security in Syria. © 2014 Samer Muscati/ Human Rights Watch

humanrightswatch:

Syria: War’s Toll on Women

 Women in Syria have been arbitrarily arrested and detained, physically abused, harassed, and tortured during Syria’s conflict by government forces, pro-government militias, and armed groups opposed to the government.

Through written and photographic portraits, the report documents ways in which the conflict impacts women in particular. Women profiled in the report experienced violations by government and pro-government forces as well as by armed groups opposed to the government such as Liwa’al-Islam and extremist groups like the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS). Some female activists and humanitarian aid providers said they had been threatened, arbitrarily arrested and detained, and tortured by government or armed opposition forces. All six former detainees profiled in the report experienced physical abuse or torture in detention; one woman was sexually assaulted multiple times. Other women said they had been victims of discriminatory restrictions on their dress and movement. Several women were injured or lost family members in indiscriminate attacks on civilians by government forces.

Photo: Some of the women profiled in this report, all of whom are now refugees in Turkey due to ongoing conflict and threats to their personal freedom and security in Syria. © 2014 Samer Muscati/ Human Rights Watch

(via humanrightsupdates)

'Unfortunately we are ruled by a tribe'
Leading Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab served two years in prison for his involvement in prodemocracy protest marches. He talks to DW about his experience - and his unbroken resolve.

How did your time in prison change you - did it strengthen your commitment to human rights in Bahrain?
Two years makes you angry, and there are two ways of fighting that anger. Either through violence, or through a peaceful struggle with the international human rights community - and that is what I choose. As a victim of regime repression, a victim of political institutions that don’t respect human rights, I am committed to the fight to change things.
Where do you go from there?

I don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow, but I’m sure our struggle is going to continue, and that we will use all peaceful means, all legitimate means recognized by the international community. We do not believe in the use of violence. Everyone knows the fight is costly and painful, but Bahrainis are willing to continue, and to pay the price. Stopping or going back is not an option.

'Unfortunately we are ruled by a tribe'

Leading Bahraini human rights activist Nabeel Rajab served two years in prison for his involvement in prodemocracy protest marches. He talks to DW about his experience - and his unbroken resolve.

How did your time in prison change you - did it strengthen your commitment to human rights in Bahrain?

Two years makes you angry, and there are two ways of fighting that anger. Either through violence, or through a peaceful struggle with the international human rights community - and that is what I choose. As a victim of regime repression, a victim of political institutions that don’t respect human rights, I am committed to the fight to change things.

Where do you go from there?

I don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow, but I’m sure our struggle is going to continue, and that we will use all peaceful means, all legitimate means recognized by the international community. We do not believe in the use of violence. Everyone knows the fight is costly and painful, but Bahrainis are willing to continue, and to pay the price. Stopping or going back is not an option.

guardian:

The number of people forced to flee their homes across the world has exceeded 50 million for the first time since the second world war. More
Graphic: Cath Levett 

guardian:

The number of people forced to flee their homes across the world has exceeded 50 million for the first time since the second world war. More

Graphic: Cath Levett